Clifford Pier

80 Collyer Quay, Singapore 049326

Location: 80 Collyer Quay

DESCRIPTION

Clifford Pier, built between 1927 and 1933, was named after Sir Hugh Clifford, Governor of the Straits Settlements between 1927 and 1929. It was designed in the art décor fashion by Frank Dorrington Ward of the Public Works Department and the construction was undertaken by one Woh Hup, a local contractor. It is clear to this day that considerable thought went into the detail of the design, which is still pleasing to the eye.

HISTORY

Historically, Johnston’s Pier had been the primary embarkation point for all sea traffic landing in Singapore but, over the years, found itself unable to cope with an increasing volume of traffic. So Clifford Pier was built to replace Johnston Pier and accommodate greater levels of traffic.

As a key landing and departure point for sea travellers to and from Singapore, incoming passengers alighting from ships anchored off the harbour were ferried to the pier by smaller boats where customs and immigration personnel, as well as the police, were stationed at the pier. Consequently the Pier became a bustling hive of activity, a junction for arrivals and departures of dignitaries, immigrants and daily workers.

During World War II the Pier was the focal point for ships conveying doctors, nurses, equipment, provisions, officers and civilians. As such it was targeted by Japanese aircraft and their ships waited in the shipping lanes. Clifford Pier would have been a silent witness to every extreme of emotion as each individual drama was played out there.

Renovated for around $10,000 in 1949 after World war II, the pier became a popular embarkation point to neighbouring islands such as Kusu Island to visit the temples or offshore fishing trips.

Clifford Pier became the preferred venue for the annual New Year’s Day sea sports event – where skilled boatmen displayed their seamanship in a series of boat races and large crowds would gather at the pier and along the waterfront to watch the races. All sorts of boats took part including koleh, sampans, prahu, canoes, dinghys and yachts.11

In the 1970s he pier had underwent several renovations and modifications to increase its capacity.

The Pier was known as “red light harbour” (a red-light district), in the 1980s and early 1990s as prostitution was rampant in the area and shipping was dwindling, moving to newer ports in the west of the island, exacerbated by the fact that the public now preferred to fly to their destinations rather than take sea journeys. And so, as the years progressed, Clifford Pier became less popular

On 1 April 2006, the last bumboat left Clifford Pier as the last of the remaining sea traffic was relocated to Marina South Pier and the closing ceremony for the pier was held on 13 April 2006.

On 14 March 2007, Clifford Pier was gazetted for conservation.

CURRENT

Clifford Pier is currently part of the Fullerton Heritage precinct, which was launched in 2010.

Still retaining its architectural splendour, it is now a dining and heritage complex.



References

1. National Library Board Singapore . (2015, July 30). Clifford Pier. Retrieved from SINGAPORE INFOPEDIA: Link Here

2. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. (2015, July 11). Article: Clifford Pier. Retrieved from WIKIPEDIA THE FREE ENCYCLOPEDIA: Link Here



References

Tyers, R. (1993). Ray Tyers’ Singapore: Then & now. Singapore: Landmark Books. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 TYE-[HIS]); Savage, V. R., & Yeoh, B. S. A. (2013). Singapore street names: A study of toponymics. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, pp. 85–86. (Call no.: RSING 915.9570014 SAV-[TRA]); Lim, R. (1980, September 9). Up Singapore River. New Nation, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Sir Hugh Clifford. (1932, June 11). The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (1884–1942), p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Pugalenthi Sr. (1999). Singapore landmarks: Monuments, memorials, statues and historic sites. Singapore: VJ Times International, pp. 211–212. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 PUG-[HIS]); Wan, M. H., & Lau, J. (2009). Heritage places of Singapore. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 16. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 WAN-[HIS])

Modern pier for Singapore. (1929, October 23). The Straits Times, p. 17. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; New pier in memory of governor. (1988, December 16). The Straits Times, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Drabble, D. (1950, April 20). Clifford Pier comes to life: Gateway to Singapore is well watched. The Straits Times, p. 10. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Ang, K. (2013, May–June). Clifford Pier – A gateway to a new life. Skyline, 18. Retrieved from Urban Redevelopment Authority website: Link Here.

Drabble, D. (1950, April 20). Clifford Pier comes to life: Gateway to Singapore is well watched. The Straits Times, p. 10. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; A glimpse into the colourful past of the Red Lamp Pier. (2004, January 26). The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Ong, P. (2006, April 13). Speech by Mr Peter Ong
Chairman, Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore at the closing ceremony of Clifford Pier Thursday, 13 April 2006, 5.30 pm – the crossing. Retrieved from Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore website: Link Here

Sharp, I. (2011). The Fullerton Heritage: Where the past meets the present. Singapore: ORO Editions, p. 35. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 SHA); Tyers, R. (1993). Ray Tyers’ Singapore: Then & now. Singapore: Landmark Books, p. 100. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 TYE-[HIS])

Urban Redevelopment Authority. (2013). Historic waterfont, p. 2. Retrieved from Urban Redevelopment Authority website: Link Here Sea sports. (1937, January 2). The Straits Times, p. 20; Big crowds will pack Collyer Quay for the koleh races. (1955, January 1). The Straits Times, p. 4; Off to a good start at the New Year sea sports. (1961, January 3). The Straits Times, p. 1; Great New Year’s Day regatta in Singapore harbour. (1936, January 3). The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser (1884–1942), p. 15. Retrieved.from NewspaperSG.

Wan, M. H., & Lau, J. (2009). Heritage places of Singapore. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 16. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 WAN-[HIS]); Sharp, I. (2011). The Fullerton Heritage: Where the past meets the present. Singapore: ORO Editions, p. 36. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 SHA); Low, A. (1986, October 5). Kusu: From rock outcrop to holiday resort. The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Lee, G. (1991, September 11). Clifford Pier a haunt for Indonesian prostitutes. The Straits Times, p. 23. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

‘Ang Teng’ Thai girls remain in police custody as probe goes on. (1982, December 9). Singapore Monitor, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

An icon makes way. (2006, April 14). The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Tan, M. (1985, February 19). A road by any other name’s still a street. The Straits Times, p. 10. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Sit, Y. F. (1948, December 12). Collyer Quay is its official name but the Chinese call it 紅燈路 [Hongdenglu]. The Straits Times, p. 6. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

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